How “Initiative” Can Make a Difference?

Colleges want to see students exhibit initiative. Admissions officers seek “stories” that prove that students can  “take the reigns” and step into new opportunities. We work with students to create and document their experiences with the belief that the resume maps a “life well lived.”

What is Initiative?

Students who take the initiative are unwilling to accept the status quo but are willing to challenge it, do things to improve, and generate outcomes. They are proactive in finding solutions and putting them into action.

Why does Initiative Matter?

Students who take the initiative are unwilling to accept the status quo but are willing to challenge it, do things to improve, and generate outcomes. They are proactive in finding solutions and putting them into action.

To learn more about “what colleges are looking for,” check our blog on
Drive and Intellectual Curiosity or join us for a webinar on Monday, January 31, 2022 at 12:30-1:15 MST.

What Will Get Me Into College? Why Intellectual Curiosity Matters.

The college admissions process is stressful.  Students are bombarded with the pressure and expectation that they will have top scores, an abundant activity list, and write a personal statement that will blow everyone away.  In my college educational consulting practice, I find that most parents and students are confused and bewildered by the abundance of information.  As a top consultant in the field, I strive to provide researched-based and timely information so that students are informed with accurate advice. This month, I have been exploring the topic:  What are colleges looking for?  In last week’s post, we explored the topic of DRIVE as one of the traits that admissions directors seek.  The student’s job is to PROVE these traits by aligning personal narratives to the qualities inherent in Drive. Students who prove drive tell stories such as:

Examples of DRIVE

  • When I didn’t make the volleyball team, I joined rock climbing and now I climb 2 x’s a week and compete on a traveling team 
  • I struggled in Chemistry and instead of switching to the easier class, I started meeting with my teacher during her office hours 
  • I wanted to place in speech and debate so I found a mentor to work with me and now I am placing-and striving to place in nationals.

What is Intellectual Curiosity?

  • Intellectually curious students spend their free time learning for the fun of it, challenging their own views, and pondering new ideas.
  • These students will go above and beyond their coursework to gain a deeper understanding of the subjects and topics that interest them, such as by going on to the internet to learn more.
  • They love finding unique connections between their areas of interest and formulating new ideas. 

Why does Intellectual Curiosity matter?

  • Colleges know that students who are deeply interested in a subject or topic are more likely to succeed in classes, contribute to the college community, and be successful after graduating.
  • They want to empower intellectually curious students to make an impact on their chosen field.
 

Top 10 Tips to Prove Intellectual Curiosity  

 
1.  READ, READ READ. Students who read are more interesting and have more to say about the world.
 
2.  Listen to podcasts to expand interests and passions.

3.  Subscribe to magazines on topics that pique interest.

4. Documentaries are a great way to dig deeper beyond the classroom walls.

5. Sign up for academic programs in the summer that inspire and inform. 

6. Write an opinion piece for the local newspaper and submit it for publication. 

7. Secure an internship in an area of interest. 

8.  Get to know teachers and meet with them on a regular basis.

9.  Engage with a mentor and pursue a research project. 

10.  Keep track of all your efforts in a spread sheet as many colleges require a list of how a student has pursued their interests.

 

 

LUNCH AND LEARN WITH LAURA BARR

January 31 at 12:30 pm

Join Laura Barr in her Lunch and Learn as she explores the topic of “What exactly are colleges looking for and how can parents help.” This topic is relevant for parents of all ages.   

When is it?

January 31 at 12:30. 

Sign up with this link here: http://20995309.hs-sites.com/lunchandlearn

 

Why is drive important for college admissions?

The Common Application requires students to share the “story” of their high school years by including transcript, test scores, activities list, resume, personal statement, and supplemental essays.  

College admissions officers are also looking for character traits that “bring the student to life beyond the numbers.”   The student’s responsibility is to prove these traits throughout the college application. 

One of the top traits students are looking for is DRIVE.

To learn more about Drive and Motivation check out Daniel Pink’s Book and Podcast on parenting for Grit and Drive! 

What is Drive?

  • Driven students push themselves to succeed no matter the odds.
  • Driven students usually have confronted difficult situations and emerged stronger, wiser, and determined.
  • They are confident in their ability to solve new challenges.

Why is Drive Important? 

  • Colleges know that the transition after high school can be challenging—college students face tougher classes, more activities, and new social pressures.
  • Driven students are likely to overcome these challenges to graduate, do well in classes, and succeed after graduating.

LUNCH AND LEARN WITH LAURA BARR

January 31 at 12:30-1:15  pm MST

Join Laura Barr in her Lunch and Learn as she explores the topic of “What exactly are colleges looking for and how can parents help.” This topic is relevant for parents of all ages.   

When is it?

January 31 at 12:30. 

Sign up with this link here: http://20995309.hs-sites.com/lunchandlear

Gratitude Exercise eBook

It is an absolute honor to work with kind, curious students who are eager and committed to creating a post-graduate life that provides meaning and purpose. Much of my work is asking meaningful questions that offer fodder for growth. As we head into a reflection, rest, and gratitude period, I wanted to share some of my favorite gratitude questions that trigger meaningful and heartful conversations. 

The more gratitude we practice, the happier we become. Research proves that active habits in consciously showing and sharing gratitude improve self-esteem, self-efficacy, and general outlook. To learn more about the research, check out this article from Berkley.

To prepare our students for the application plan, we are inspired by Warren Berger’s book  “More Beautiful Questions” to mine for passion, purpose, and identity development. 

TIP:  Download our Gratitude exercise and create a habit of talking with students about what matters most to them.